Lights on for Life



Lights on for Life

Last month my husband and I ventured on a road trip out West where one of our children and family live. We enjoy taking the road less traveled, especially when we are not confined by time, by leaving behind the hustle and bustle of the interstate system. Driving through Kansas, we were thankful for the multitude of grassroots pro-life signs along state highways. I was especially impacted by this sign.


It was intended to be a traffic sign for safety and saving lives—a noble cause. However, my reflections moved on to how this applies in our culture of death. We must continue to keep our lights on to save lives, not to be in darkness.
Our lights should be visible to others by our advocacy and knowledge of current life issues. Right now, you are choosing to be a light by reading this newsletter. It is apparent that you have a desire to help others.
It is easier to be in darkness, choosing to bury one’s head in the sand rather than face the current culture of death and combat it. Indifference and withdrawal from the battle is the reaction of many people to the overwhelming issues facing us in this imperfect world. Some people I know lament how depressing things are right now, and many others are unable to see beyond their tragic immediate family issues. Some may not even realize the inroads the culture of death has made into all facets of society because their lives are so busy. The busyness of life—such as driving on an interstate, just focusing on the other vehicles and the threats to our lives and sometimes dealing with inclement weather—leaves us little time or energy to focus on other matters concerning life and death.
In this August 2019 newsletter, we reveal some “lights on for life” that you can contact for advice and help. The first shining light is Judie Brown, President of American Life League and a member of HALO’s Advisory Board, who gave guidance to a person who consulted her by providing practical information about medical advance directives and do not resuscitate (DNR) orders.
Another bright light is Marlene Reid, a member of HALO’s Board of Directors, who shares her personal story of taking that first step in 1973 and her subsequent involvement in many aspects of the battle for life.
The Case in Point by Ron Panzer, President of the Hospice Patients Alliance and another “light on for life,” concerns a woman—the sister of a patient—who called Ron for advice to help save the patient’s life. He shares with us the importance of a medical power of attorney (MPA) and other tips for protecting loved ones from tainted hospices and palliative care programs.
Another steadfast light is Alex Schadenberg, Executive Director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition and member of HALO’s Board. In his July 18th blog, “Woman Pressured to Approve Death by Sedation/Dehydration for her Aunt,” Alex highlights a call he received involving a case of institutionalized elder abuse and discrimination. [http://alexschadenberg.blogspot.com/2019/07/woman-pressured-to-approve-sedation-and.html]
Are you a “light on for life” in your place of worship, community, family, and even your state? Do you have the basic knowledge to be a life-affirming advocate for a loved one when he or she is in a hospital, nursing home, or hospice? If not, do you know someone who is a light that you can contact immediately if there is a problem or question? Please reflect on what role you want to have or should take on to be a light in the darkness of the culture of death and help restore the culture of life.
We will continue to bring you more examples of “lights on for life” in future editions of the HALO Monthly. If you or someone you know is a “light on for life,” send us your story and we may publish it to inspire others. Thank you.
Note: HALO is hoping to soon have an operational 24/7 hotline for US callers to expedite help when time is important. Currently, if you need help, please email feedback@halorganization.com and a patient advocate will responds as soon as possible.

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