WHAT COLOR ARE YOU?



WHAT COLOR ARE YOU?

My husband is a retired law enforcement officer whose observation skills are amazing, constant, and so protective. When we fly home from our mission trips in Africa or Central Asia, we schedule an R & R for a couple days in a European city as a halfway point. It helps our minds and bodies recuperate from time zone changes and long hours of sitting on a plane, and process what we just experienced after being on the go for several weeks.
Multiple times as we are among many people walking down a city street, my husband will say, “Let’s stop at this store.” (He does not enjoy shopping). I don’t question him, but trust his judgment, training and experience as we step inside off the walkway. He watches for a short time, then explains that someone or some people have been closely following us, say, for three blocks, and now they have walked on by. As for me, I’m enjoying the sights, not as observant as I should be, but so grateful for his protection.
Situational awareness can protect you and others from danger and even save lives. Being attentive is important in most facets of our daily lives, and being alert is particularly important in hospital, nursing home, and hospice settings.
There is a color code for situational awareness which can help you prepare yourself mentally. It is called “Cooper’s Color Code.” Here are shortened versions of the definitions and situations that correspond to each of the four simple colors used in this code.
Condition White: You are “unaware and unprepared.” You ignore warning signs. (This describes me in the experiences above.)
Condition Yellow: You are aware of what is happening around you, including sensing danger. It is “relaxed and calm alertness.” You have confidence that you know how to take care of yourself and others. (This should be all of us.)
Condition Orange: You have identified a specific threat. You sense and know something is not right. (This would be my husband targeting possible pick-pocketers or worse.)
Condition Red: A potential threat reveals itself as an imminent threat of grave bodily harm or death. Because you are not caught off guard, you have a much better chance of defending yourself.
Don’t get caught off guard. Pay attention to the signs that your life or the life of a loved one may be in danger. Information available on the HALO website will help you be on guard and recognize when there is an imminent threat to you or a loved one in a healthcare situation. It may be a matter of life and death, so don’t wait. Prepare now.
Below are some of the helpful Resources you will find when you visit www.halorganization.com.
PATIENT ADVOCACY VIDEO: As a relative, friend, or volunteer, have you ever been called upon to support/advocate for a person in a healthcare setting? Or are you currently in such a situation? While it is certainly a blessing to be of service, many questions may arise, such as:
  • What is the most important skill needed for patient advocacy?
  • How can I be of assistance to a loved one or another patient who is seriously ill and/or their family?
  • Who can I call on for help if it’s needed?
These are some of the topics covered in HALO'S YouTube presentation on Patient Advocacy. Please take time to view this valuable resource and keep it handy as an essential guide.
DRUGS COMMONLY USED IN HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE CAREThis fact sheet is designed to help patients and families discuss with their health care providers the drugs used to treat pain and other symptoms. It lists many of the drugs most commonly used in hospice and palliative care, and their side effects; provides information about various pain management methods; and warns of the dangers of certain combinations of drugs, and the ways in which powerful drugs may be inappropriately used.
QUESTIONS TO ASK A HOSPICE BEFORE ADMISSIONThis is a list of questions to ask when interviewing a hospice agency before entrusting yourself or a loved one to its care. All hospices are not the same. Knowing a hospice agency’s philosophy and the services it provides is vitally important.
LIFE-AFFIRMING PRINCIPLES FOR MEDICAL DECISION-MAKINGThis is an easy to use tool which will assist you to formulate and discuss your values and wishes with health care providers and your agent (the person you legally authorize to make medical decisions for you in the event you are unable to do so for yourself).
ARE ORGAN DONORS TRULY DEAD BEFORE THEIR ORGANS ARE TAKEN?: This straight-talking fact sheet explores
  • why “brain death” is a controversial diagnosis,
  • what organ donation after “circulatory death” means and how it is done,
  • how changes to the Anatomical Gift Act might adversely affect you or a loved one, and
  • what you need to know before you consider signing up to be an organ donor.
If you have questions or comments, please email feedback@halorganization.com.

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